Cinnamon 2.8: Visual workspace switcher applet
by clem 43

The workspace switcher applet is now able to show a visual representation of your workspaces, with little cubes for the windows inside of them :)

switcher

In the example above you’re looking at two workspaces with three windows each.

A couple of things to consider:

  • This hasn’t been themed yet, so it should look nicer by the time 2.8 is released (hopefully).
  • I’m using dual monitors at the moment, that’s why the workspaces look so large (one window on each workspace is on the right monitor).
  • The workspace switcher applet is still also able to represent workspaces with simple 1, 2, 3 buttons. That’s now configurable in the applet settings.
  • Hovering on a workspace displays its name in a tooltip.
  • The right-click menu now also allows you to remove the current workspace.

The reason I worked on that is because I’d like to make it easier for novice users not only to use workspaces but to discover them and to quickly understand what they are and how they work. So there’s a couple of changes which are being considered for the next Linux Mint release:

  • The window-quick-list applet would be removed from the panel by default.
  • Cinnamon would ship with only one workspace by default.
  • The workspace-switcher applet would be present in the panel by default, probably in visual mode.

As a user spawns applications and windows, his attention would soon or later be caught by the little visual representation mimicking his screen. He’d see “Workspace 1” when hovering it and as clicking on it didn’t do anything, he’d eventually right-click and see “Manage workspaces (Expo)”, “Add a new workspace” and a greyed out “Remove the current workspace”. Expo might be intimidating but any click would bring him back where he was. Adding a new workspace would result in that visual representation he already got himself familiar with (I’m hoping I’m not making an assumption here..) show another area.. clicking on it would switch workspace, show the name in OSD, and all that is animated to give the sensation of going towards the right.. the applet being still there he could make his way back easily.

The challenge then is to make it look good. That applet doesn’t look like the other ones, it’s got the potential to take space and in its initial form, when no windows are shown.. it can look a bit empty and out of place.

If we manage, then it might make workspace discovery much simpler (yes, I know.. we just reinvented MATE here, I know) :)

43 thoughts on “Cinnamon 2.8: Visual workspace switcher applet

  1. brouillon Sep 2,2015 13:31

    This one take too much place in panel, i know there is sometimes some unused space but it’s not enough, please have a look :)

  2. RichardG Sep 2,2015 13:35

    Aah ! I’ve been waiting for this !
    Thanx for reading my mind ;-)

    Maybe you could still start out with a number when there are no windows to show ?
    And in case of multiple monitors (and hence desktops) 1a-1b, 2a-2b (assuming here that no-one has 26 monitors 8-P)

    There are tons of ideas to implement later to make it more pleasing or workable.
    Making it zoom a bit if you hover to get more detail is one, but I’ll digress.
    Let’s get this puppy on the road first !

    Thanx and you just made 2.8 seeming further away as ever ;-/
    rg,rg

  3. jtflynnz Sep 2,2015 13:42

    Exciting to see these small refinements (yes it may be in Mate, but it will be nice to have on Cinnamon too!). Its the details like these that really help make the desktop feel so well put together(and the customization that allows us to make it just right for us!). I really appreciate the work here, even though 2.6 just came out, I am already beginning to anticipate what you will do with 2.8.

    The jump from 2.4 to 2.6 was visually minor, but the work you and the team have put into that smoothness of the desktop is what makes all the difference! It is really one of the most stable computer experiences, beginning to rival even the “out of the box” feel and stability of OSX (at least in my limited experiences with it from family members and work). I for one will be thrilled to see what else you guys release in the future, even if it mainly continues to pare down on the bugs and continue polishing up Cinnamon.

  4. Mani Sep 2,2015 14:00

    Any chance that you could implement a 2D workspace grid as it is possible in mate, kde, xfce and nearly every other DE except of gnome?

    • clem Sep 2,2015 14:26

      You mean to navigate workspaces not only left/right but up/down?

      • Mani Sep 2,2015 15:49

        Exactly, I know that there is already a third party applet, but I think this is something that really should be there out of the box

  5. plata Sep 2,2015 16:16

    I’m not to sure that the average Cinnamon user wants to use multiple workspaces. I think this is especially true for those people who would profit from the switcher being more accessible.

    If I observe Mint users I know, there are mainly two types of users:
    1. Power users/enthusiasts – no need to make workspaces more accessible
    2. Casual user – not using workspaces; usually opens 1-2 windows at a time (e.g. Browser/nemo)

    Maybe features like this (or e.g. window snapping) should be added in the Linux Mint installer and/or something like “take a tour” after the first boot.

  6. Francis Sep 2,2015 17:25

    Clem et al,
    I applaud the execution of a design vision which embraces the newcomer. I adore the OS that is Mint and the Cinnamon Desktop Environment. It works very well and it makes sense. This blog post is testament to the design philosophy and while the enhancement is not immediately important to me, I rejoice that it will become reality.
    Cheers all,
    Francis

  7. Sam Sep 2,2015 19:38

    Looking good!

    In my opinion, the default config should include the expo applet. That is hands down the most attractive feature of Cinnamon — an exposé-esque overview with dynamic workspaces that can be added/removed from the overview. I love it!

  8. PaulC-L5 Sep 2,2015 20:28

    I kind of agree with Plata… I use workspaces on Cinnamon / Betsy heavily – in professional life – generally having a workspace dedicated to each client im working on… 3 or 4 apps in each and email and IM shared across the lot. A fairly typical usage i would have thought.
    The ctrl+up / down / left / right handles easy switching when i need to.
    So I’m a “1” in Platas assessment and find it is easy and intuitive already.
    So it’d just be eye candy for me.

  9. Pierre Sep 2,2015 20:55

    Hi,

    It would be great to have REAL individual workspaces like in KDE. I mean where you could get different icons, wallpaper, desklets, applets on the panel, etc. and save the window positions.

    It could be useful to make (for example) a “surf” workspace with thunderbid, firefox, chrominim, pidgin icons, another workspace “development” with shortcuts to the development tools, etc.

    Are there any plans for going in such a direction in future releases of Cinnamon?

    • HPMC13 Sep 3,2015 01:07

      Thank you! As much as I dislike KDE, I keep looking at it for this reason alone. You turn Pierre’s and dRaiser’s ideas into reality and I think Mint would get so much closer to, simply, perfect.

  10. dRaiser Sep 2,2015 21:01

    I know it’s a lot of work, but I would love multiple independent workspaces per monitor. ATM I’ve wrote some scripts to achieve similar effect, but it’s far from perfect.

  11. Simon B Sep 2,2015 21:14

    There are also two third party apps in the same area that I like. workspace-grid@hernejj is visually very compact and I really like the grid representation. workspace-name@willurd simply shows the workspace name and pops up a menu to change workspace when clicked. They complement each other nicely.

  12. M.Z. Sep 3,2015 00:56

    Some nice improvements here & a reason to look forward to the next Cinnamon release. One of the things that I miss most from other desktops in Cinnamon’s workspace switcher is the ability to arrange the switcher into a 2×2 grid (it’s in the KDE pager & can be set in XFCE). Any chance of this showing up soon?

    One other thing I always thought was slick in KDE & missed in Cinnamon was the agility to turn the pager/switcher into a ‘show desktop’ button. Perhaps it’s just me but showing the desktop when you click on the current one sort of made intuitive sense to me & it removes the clutter of having 2 different applets/widgets. If you could integrate a option for the show desktop function & the tooltip said ‘show desktop 1’ or ‘switch to workspace 2’ when you hovered over the different desktops I think it would make for a very slick & intuitive applet. Of course there are some naming differences between Cinnamon & KDE that may make things less apparent (workspaces vs desktops), but I think it would still work & make sense to most users. Just some thoughts, keep up the good work.

  13. Georgi Sep 3,2015 08:49

    Another little touch, nice work! I don’t use workspaces at all so I won’t comment further on this topic because it will be unfair. Usually I open one window at time and always I disable the workspace switcher.

  14. Borsook Sep 3,2015 13:21

    Two things:
    1. Shipping with the applet but only one workplace hurts the discoverablity as the user has to find them and learn how to add a new one before they can use it.
    2.I really wish Cinnamon had the vertical panel added, as it is, this applet will probably need serious reworking to play nice with that mode, the longer the delay with vertical panel the more problems adding it will cause.

  15. Daniel Sep 3,2015 18:21

    Nice work! However, as far as workspace switchers go, there is one feature that I found only in MATE so far: The ability to move windows to a different workspace by dragging their panel button unto the desired workspace in the switcher. This is only a small detail, but one that is very useful and important to me. Therefore I would love to see it implemented in other desktop environments such as Cinnamon as well.

    Thanks to everyone for their efforts in creating a great Linux desktop experience.

  16. Rehdon Sep 17,2015 11:44

    Clem, if you want a novice user note and start using multiple workspaces I’d say the most effective way would be to start with at least two different workspaces: the user would note that all the windows s/he opens relate to only one of the available workspaces, and would then click on the empty one out of curiosity.

  17. Mel Sep 17,2015 17:38

    @Clem:
    as much as I like your idea, I have to respectfully say [and mention] that [I think] this is a bad idea. It’s screen-hogging, screen-wasting, there’s already a ton of applets/widgets/whatever-you-call-them-in-Linux-Mint that you can use to show/provide this same functionality. Plus, the method you guys were using in Linux Mint 16 Petra Cinnamon 64-bit already worked just fine. (This was the very first Linux Mint distro that I used by the way). (And it’s also the very first Linux distro that I used on my home computer, my Asus laptop).

    @plata:
    I agree with what user “plata” mentioned. In that slideshow that we see when we’re installing Linux Mint, there should be a section in there that shows the workspaces/windows and how to use them.

    Likewise, there should also be in the “Welcome Screen” a ‘guided tour’ (don’t know what else to call it) that shows the “workspaces” (the software-program “Norton Desktop” for Windows 95 called it “virtual desktops”) and how to use them. (Or at the very least provide a link in the “Welcome Screen” that will take you to a webpage that shows you where the workspaces are, how to use them, introduces you to the “workspaces” and the concept of “Workspaces”[,] and how to use them, etc. etc.). (Like there is already a link in the “Welcome Screen” called “Tutorials” and when I clicked on it it took me to this webpage, http://community.linuxmint.com/tutorial , where I could see [a Linux Mint] tutorial(s) for different things).

    @Sam:
    I’m not sure what you mean by “Explo” applet but when I checked the “Workspace”-settings [in Linux Mint Cinnamon (in 16, 17, 17.1, and 17.2) I noticed that the “Expo” setting is already [, by default,] turned “On”. I think this is what you mean: How, when we go to the “Workspaces” in Cinnamon, they’re already shown in the ‘Grid’-type method (I’m not sure what else to call it, but I see that when I have 4 workspaces activated, they’re each shown in a ‘grid’-type fashion. Or ‘expo’ I guess is how Mac-OS-X calls it). (Which I guess is what you were talking about).

    @PaulC-L5:
    It took me a minute[,] when reading this[,] to understand what user “PaulC-L5” meant and/or what he was saying. I think I agree with him. I like the Linux Mint Cinnamon workspaces just the way they are. No changes are needed.
    (There’s already been enough changes from Linux Mint 16 Cinnamon to Linux Mint 17.2 Cinnamon as it is). (First you had the upper-left ‘hot-corner’ enabled by default. Then you turned it off by-default. (and explained in the “New Features” page of Linux-Mint-17 as to why).
    And now you want to make lazy people even lazier by exposing (a-la-Mate) the workspaces in the Taskbar (ie. “Panel”) AND remove the “All Windows” button/applet/widget/whatever-you-call-it , which is already handy enough [there] as it is.
    It allows me to see what is in ALL the workspaces I have, it allows me to see [what is] ALL the windows/programs/etc. I have open, in EACH of the workspaces I have open, and it allows me to quickly left-click [on them] to easily get to any of them (no matter where [and/or in what workspace] I have them in).
    The ‘Expo’ feature does the same thing [in Expo’s own visual way], and I like them both. I don’t even use the “show all windows” feature in the “Workspace [settings]” in the “Control Panel” thingy. Because the “All Windows” button in the Taskbar (ie. “Panel”) already provides that feature/functionality for me. PLUS it also shows what windows I have in ALL my workspaces (not just the one I’m currently in, like the “show all windows” function in the “Workspace”-settings does) at any given time.

    I think that the Linux Mint Cinnamon workspaces should remain the same, and not have this unnecessary “a-la-Mate” Workspaces-square-thingies-in-the-Taskbar/Panel added to them.

    @Pierre:
    I remember when I read that Mate was less intensive on computer resources than Cinnamon. And I remember when I read that KDE was more intensive on computer resources than Cinnamon. I get the feeling that one of the reasons why [KDE is more-intensive on computer-resources than Cinnamon] is the reason that you mentioned below: “REAL individual workspaces like in KDE. I mean where you could get different icons, wallpaper, desklets, applets on the panel, etc. and save the window positions”. All that requires computer-hardware and pretty-intensive computer resources in order to do.

    No offense but personally I like Cinnamon the way it is. If you want something more powerful [and even more powerful than Cinnamon] that can do all that stuff you should get KDE. That’s why we have different Linux desktop-environments and distros and stuff to choose from. ” Here’s what we have available and here are the different desktop-environments to choose from, and here’s what each of them does. Pick your poison”.

    @M.Z.
    I think Cinnamon already does that. (At least it did that in Linux Mint 16 Cinnamon. And it’s continued to do that in Linux Mint 17 Cinnamon, 17.1 Cinnamon, and 17.2 Cinnamon (which is what I’m currently using right-now by the way)). It already shows stuff in a “2×2 ‘grid'”. (You can also very easily see it when you have 2, or even 4, 8, 16, etc., workspaces on). (I think Mac-OS-X calls it “Expose” or “Expo”, something along those lines). And I think @Sam was talking about it and mentioning it earlier. (ie. the “Expo” thingy[, by the way]).

    In regards to your comment “One other thing I always thought was slick in KDE & missed in Cinnamon was the agility to turn the pager/switcher into a ‘show desktop’ button.”, I think there is already a “Show Desktop” button in the Cinnamon Panel/Taskbar. (Look in the lower-left-hand-corner, next to the “Menu” button and the “Firefox” button). There is no need to add another [Show-Desktop] button.

    @Daniel:
    There is already a feature/function/functionality like that in Cinnamon. When you’re in the “Expose/Expo” view (Or should I say “watching all your workspaces”?) just “drag-and-drop” (ie. left-click on the window you want to move to another workspace/virtual-desktop, and after-clicking hold the left-mouse-button (don’t release it), and ‘drag’ the mouse-cursor/window over to the virtual-desktop/workspace that you want to have that particular [program] window in, and let-go of the left-mouse-button) the program-window over to the virtual-desktop/workspace that you want to have it in. Period. That simple. Easy :-) .
    (Referring to what you said about “Nice work! However, as far as workspace switchers go, there is one feature that I found only in MATE so far: The ability to move windows to a different workspace by dragging their panel button unto the desired workspace in the switcher. This is only a small detail, but one that is very useful and important to me. Therefore I would love to see it implemented in other desktop environments such as Cinnamon as well.”)

    @Rehdon:
    I remember when Linux Mint 16 Cinnamon “Petra” already had that. (ie. what you said about “have 2 workspaces/virtual-desktops activated by default”). And they (the Linux Mint developers) already had the “move your mouse-cursor to the upper-left-hand-corner of the screen to activate the ‘show all workspaces’ view” activated by default. And ever since Linux Mint 17 (where they explained in the “New Features of Linux Mint 17 Cinnamon” page), I go to the “Workspaces” settings in the “Control Panel” and I activate the “Expose” (“Expose” or “Expo” or whatever-you-call-it–in-Linux-Mint) view by default. [See my screenshot] http://picpaste.com/my_workspace_settings_-_Screenshot_from_2015-09-17_12_25_46.png

    I really think that the workspaces[/”virtual desktops”] already work [[just] fine] the way they are [and are supposed to work].

  18. Mel Sep 17,2015 18:17

    i need to correct a typo on a paragraph i wrote in my earlier message:

    <>

    @Sam:
    I’m not sure what you mean by “Explo” applet but when I checked the “Workspace”-settings [in Linux Mint Cinnamon (in 16, 17, 17.1, and 17.2) I noticed that the “Expo” setting is already [, by default,] turned “On”. I think this is what you mean: How, when we go to the “Workspaces” in Cinnamon, they’re already shown in the ‘Grid’-type method (I’m not sure what else to call it, but I see that when I have 4 workspaces activated, they’re each shown in a ‘grid’-type fashion. Or ‘expo’ I guess is how Mac-OS-X calls it). (Which I guess is what you were talking about).

    <>

    Expo, not “Explo”, :-P

  19. Mel Sep 17,2015 18:22

    I need to make another correction.

    In my previous comment “” Here’s what we have available and here are the different desktop-environments to choose from, and here’s what each of them does. Pick your poison”.” I had written “[Linux]” before (with arrows instead of brackets) so it would be like if Linux [and/or Tux] was saying it. However, the arrows didn’t get posted :-(

  20. Mel Oct 9,2015 12:36

    I have to apologize.

    When I was talking about

    —>The ‘Expo’ feature does the same thing [in Expo’s own visual way], and I like them both. I don’t even use the “show all windows” feature in the “Workspace [settings]” in the “Control Panel” thingy.<—

    I was talking about the "Hot Corners" section in the "Control Panel" thingy (which in Mint is the "Settings" thing in the "Mint-menu" represented by a "grey box with cogs in it" icon).

    I apologize to anyone that didn't know what the heck I was talking about when they read my original post(s).

  21. JosephM Oct 11,2015 11:24

    Just to be clear, the new “visual” representation is optional. You can still keep the workspace-switcher just as it was before.

  22. Mel Oct 15,2015 13:20

    @JosephM: I understand. However, that’s not the only thing I am talking about. I am also talking about the “Window-List” thingy on the right-hand-side of the clock.
    (I will post a screenshot in a bit. The previous picpaste-links I posted were set to only appear for 2 hours. I will post the pictures again but this time set to “be posted permanently”. I’m currently on my old Toshiba Satellite laptop with Windows XP Pro SP3 so I can’t post the pictures right this second. I’ll do it as soon as I get on Linux Mint 17.2 Cinnamon 64-bit on my Asus laptop).

  23. Mel Oct 15,2015 13:31

    This is what I’m fine with:

    “The workspace switcher applet is now able to show a visual representation of your workspaces, with little cubes for the windows inside of them :) ”

    This is what I’m NOT fine with (like I said before):

    “So there’s a couple of changes which are being considered for the next Linux Mint release:

    The window-quick-list applet would be removed from the panel by default.

    The workspace-switcher applet would be present in the panel by default, probably in visual mode.”

    I don’t mind the “Cinnamon would ship with only one workspace by default” THAT much because I can (at least I can do this in the CURRENT Linux Mint 17.2 Cinnamon 64-bit) go to the “virtual desktops” view (by moving to the upper-left ‘hot-corner’ (like it will show in the desktop-screenshots I posted before and will re-post in a bit) and clicking the “Plus” (ie. + ) symbol to add/make a new virtual-desktop (ie. what Linux calls “workspace(s)”)), but if the “show all windows” list thingy is removed, I will be SEVERELY disappointed, as I use that feature ALOT (AT-*LEAST* as much as I do the “show all workspaces” hotcorner), and I prefer not to mess with things I don’t know. (I haven’t even used the “Software Manager” yet because in the program I’m looking for I find 2, 3, or even 4 of the exact same program, and I’m not really sure (let alone sure-AT-*ALL*) which program to click “Install” on. Plus that’s how I screwed up my AST-Advantage desktop computer with Windows 98 on it: by messing with things I didn’t know and just “winging it”. I cut-and-pasted the entire contents of the “C” drive to the “Desktop”, and just by doing that, I *MAJORLY* screwed-up my computer. I don’t want to do THAT again (let alone a repeat of anything like THAT (ie. “winging it”, and, “trial by experimentation”) again).

  24. Mel Oct 15,2015 18:45

    Here are the screenshots I was talking about and/or mentioning:

    http://picpaste.com/my_workspace_settings_-_Screenshot_from_2015-09-17_12_25_46.png (my workspace settings)

    http://picpaste.com/Screenshot_from_2015-10-03_01_48_27.png (the “window-list” thing I was talking about and/or mentioning)

    http://picpaste.com/Screenshot_from_2015-10-03_01_51_34.png (a screenshot of my “workspaces”/”virtual-desktops”)

  25. Mel Oct 15,2015 19:02

    The only feature I can think about adding is adding the ability to scroll up or down that list (ie. the list of windows in the “window-list” applet) using the wheel of your mouse [the same way you can scroll up or down a really long WordPad/Microsoft-Word/LibreOffice-Writer/OpenOffice-Writer document with your mouse-wheel].

    Sometimes I have so many windows open that that list becomes really long, too long in fact for all of it to display in my computer-monitor at the same time (and therefore I have to scroll through that list the same way I scroll through a long document in Microsoft Word or any other word-processing software: With the mouse-wheel).
    (But because so far the ability to scroll up or down that list has not been added to the applet, I cannot do that. Yet).

    (Currently in those situations then what I do is go to the “view all workspaces” mode/view and then view what windows I have open in each workspace and then move them accordingly or do whatever it is I wanted to do to them and/or with them: move them to another workspace, close them, switch them to another workspace, close the workspace, rename the workspace, etc., etc., etc.).

  26. Mel Oct 15,2015 21:18

    Other features I use like crazy (in case anyone was wondering) are all the features talked-about in this link: http://www.linuxmint.com/rel_petra_cinnamon_whatsnew.php

    (especially edge-snapping, edge-tiling (in ALL the ways you can ’tile’), “user applet”, system-tray stuff, etcetera, etcetera, etcetera).

    one thing that i am wondering though, is why did they remove the “turn off notifications” ability [from the “User Applet”] and the ability to access the “account details” DIRECTLY from the “User Applet” (see screenshot: http://picpaste.com/Screenshot_from_2015-10-15_16_10_12.png ). (although the latter (ie. accessing-the-‘account-details’-directly-from-the-‘user-applet’) doesn’t bother me THAT much because i can still click on ‘system settings’ in the [same] applet and then click on ‘account details’ once i’m in the “system settings” of Linux Mint.

  27. JosephM Oct 16,2015 11:12

    Ok, just to be clear, the talk is just about “default” settings. Not about actually removing things. Maybe just not having them enabled by default.

  28. Mel Oct 21,2015 01:19

    @JosephM: I understand that. And like I said before, this consideration (as a “default” option for the “workspace switcher” applet) is what I’m fine with:

    “The workspace switcher applet is now able to show a visual representation of your workspaces, with little cubes for the windows inside of them :) ”

    What I’m NOT fine with (which is ALSO being considered as a POSSIBLE “default”-configuration in [the next version of] Linux Mint), is this thing:

    —> The window-quick-list applet would be removed from the panel by default.

    —> The workspace-switcher applet would be present in the panel by default, probably in visual mode.”

    Like I said, I understand that Clem wrote “So there’s a couple of changes which are being considered for the next Linux Mint release”, which means that right now it’s just a possibility, just a consideration, just “on the drawing board”, but I really would like that this is not what they decide to do (ie. “The workspace-switcher applet would be present in the panel by default”, and “The window-quick-list applet would be removed from the panel by default”).

    I don’t want to have functionality taken away from Linux Mint that I use (let alone use constantly and/or often), and I don’t want to have to guess which are (and/or what are the names of) the “applets”, “desklets”, “gadgets”, “extensions”, whatchamacallits, and/or features that were in Linux Mint before (that were used before and/or often by me) and now I have to go digging for because they are not in the latest version.

    I lost several perfectly good computers just because I was messing around with stuff I didn’t know, and I don’t want to go through THAT again.

    • JosephM Oct 21,2015 08:08

      No functionality is being taken away. Clem is just talking about what applets show on the panel by default in a new installation.

  29. Rustyp Oct 22,2015 08:09

    I am trying to figure out what a Workspace is once I figure that out I can probably figure out what a switcher is used for, where do you get one of these workspace switcher applets?

    How come the picture of the workspace switcher applet is only about 2″ wide and when you click on the picture it does not get bigger it just makes the screen all black around the postage stamp size thumbnail picture, I have a 24″ monitor with a postage stamp in the middle of the screen.

    Where do we find the documentation for the workspace switcher applet ?

    • clem Oct 22,2015 08:35

      Hi,

      Windows calls it “multiple-desktops”. A workspace is a desktop if you will… it’s your area where all your windows are. You can create other workspaces and have more than one and switch between them… so it’s like you’re switching between “places”… between sets of windows.

      In the existing version of Cinnamon, you can press CTRL+ALT+UP to go to “Expo”. There you can see your workspaces and create new ones, switch to one of them, move windows between them. From any workspace, you can press CTRL+ALT+RIGHT to go to the next workspace, or CTRL+ALT+LEFT to go back. Open a few windows on each and you’ll quickly see what they are. They’re just different areas where you place windows. People use them to do different things at the same time.

      To get the workspace switcher applet, go to Settings->Applets->Workspace Switcher and add it to your panel.

  30. Mel Oct 24,2015 09:11

    @JosephM’s comment “No functionality is being taken away. Clem is just talking about what applets show on the panel by default in a new installation.”:

    Isn’t that just what I said (twice or three times I might add?)?

    “And like I said before, this consideration (as a “default” option for the “workspace switcher” applet) is what I’m fine with:

    “The workspace switcher applet is now able to show a visual representation of your workspaces, with little cubes for the windows inside of them :) ”

    What I’m NOT fine with (which is ALSO being considered as a POSSIBLE “default”-configuration in [the next version of] Linux Mint), is this thing:

    —> The window-quick-list applet would be removed from the panel by default.

    —> The workspace-switcher applet would be present in the panel by default, probably in visual mode.”

    In previous posts:

    This is what I’m fine with:

    “The workspace switcher applet is now able to show a visual representation of your workspaces, with little cubes for the windows inside of them :) ”

    This is what I’m NOT fine with (like I said before):

    “So there’s a couple of changes which are being considered for the next Linux Mint release:

    The window-quick-list applet would be removed from the panel by default.

    The workspace-switcher applet would be present in the panel by default, probably in visual mode.”

    ———-

    I don’t want to resort to negativity, but little by little, I feel as if I’m being pushed. I have spent at least 10 different messages trying to explain what I mean and yet you don’t seem to understand what the heck I mean or what the heck I’m saying (based on your replies), and yet, in ALL my messages, I’m speaking plain simple English JosephM.

    And on that subject, what part of “I disagree with some of the things [that are] being considered to become “the new defaults” (which I have repeatedly stated, in more than in one occasion in this Clem’s-“blog”-post alone, in multiple ways and using various synonyms and words to express the same idea and/or message) do you not understand?

    Considering that my words are starting to look like if “I’m starting to get mad”, I’ll end this message right here.

  31. JosephM Oct 24,2015 11:47

    Calm down. I only replied the second time because the posts were almost a week apart and I had forgotten that I had already replied once.

    Besides, I only replied in the first place because you made this exact quote “I don’t want to have functionality taken away”. And that isn’t the case.

    If you don’t agree with the defaults being changed, that’s fine. For me, I would be fine with removing the window quick list by default because I never use it. In the end I really don’t care though. It’s easy enough to add/remove things from the panel that I can set it up how I wish anyway.

  32. Mel Oct 25,2015 00:05

    @JosephM: I understand. That’s alright. (Referring to what you said [about] “Calm down. I only replied the second time because the posts were almost a week apart and I had forgotten that I had already replied once.”)

  33. Mel Oct 29,2015 20:36

    @JosephM and anyone else reading this:

    You just gave me another idea. (I got the idea back when you said “If you don’t agree with the defaults being changed, that’s fine. For me, I would be fine with removing the window quick list by default because I never use it. In the end I really don’t care though. It’s easy enough to add/remove things from the panel that I can set it up how I wish anyway.”).

    I was going to reply “it’s not easy for all users. Especially people who are brand-spanking-new to GNU/Linux” because of what you said that “It’s easy enough to add/remove things from the panel that I can set it up how I wish anyway.”
    It’s hard for me because I don’t know what the heck is in the Panel, and what applets are [installed/put/whatever-the-right-term-is] on the Panel.

    Then the idea hit me: What if there was some kind of label that appears when you move the mouse-cursor over the applet, that gives you the name of the applet (yes, like those “bubble” things that appear when you move the mouse-cursor over the sound icon in the Panel or the ‘bust’-shaped icon in the Panel or the ‘wifi’-icon in the Panel, etc.).
    —–> And while I was thinking that another idea hit me:

    Why don’t you guys (the Linux Mint developers) add to the “slideshow” (the one that plays while you’re installing Linux Mint) a window that shows what applets are installed in the Panel? this window would also show, and identify (in a visual way), what icons and/or buttons are in the Panel, and what each one does, etc. etc.
    You can also add this to the “welcome screen” (the one that appears after you log in to Linux Mint & Linux Mint finishes booting up into the desktop), in the “User Guide”

  34. Alex Nov 17,2015 22:23

    Can you make global menu applet with window buttons on it (just like in Unity)? And auto removing of window decorations when window is maximized. It would be VERY useful for netbooks with small displays (10″).

    I Love MINT an Cinnamon, but only one thing I missing from Ubuntu Unity – is global menu… I am sure – there are lot of users who would love to see global menu applet in Cinnamon ;)

  35. Massimo Feb 19,2016 00:49

    I think I am going to ask for something along the lines that others have already suggested but basically it would be useful to have on the panel a list of ALL running applications (not just those on the workspace one is in), in order to switch quickly between applications in different workspaces.
    An alternate solution (which is actually what Linux Mint Xfce implements) is to have a workspace switcher that doesn’t just “visually represent” the applications in the various workspaces as grey boxes but as icons corresponding to the applications.

  36. gariba Sep 12,2016 22:17

    I could never use OS X implemetatin of multiple desktops aka Workspaces. Elementary OS made the concept easy for me to understand. But the BEST way to use I had seen is thru Gnomes’s extension Workspaces to Dock. Really beautiful, very funcional. One could change to a distro just for productivity gains of such feature.

Comments are closed.